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Mahabharata
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 417

Mahabharata

William Buck has condensed the story. The old translation from which he worked covers 5800 pages of print, while his own book is less than a tenth of that length. But by and large, Buck's rendition reflects the sequence of events in the Sanskrit epic, and he uses the traditional techniques for instance, of stories within stories, flashbacks, moral lessons laid in the mouths of principal characters.

The Mahabharata
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 736

The Mahabharata

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2006-07
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  • Publisher: iUniverse

The Mahabharata is the more recent of India's two great epics, and by far the longer. First composed by the Maharishi Vyasa in verse, it has come down the centuries in the timeless oral tradition of guru and sishya, profoundly influencing the history, culture, and art of not only the Indian subcontinent but most of south-east Asia. At 100,000 couplets, it is seven times as long as the Iliad and the Odyssey combined: far and away the greatest recorded epic known to man. The Mahabharata is the very Book of Life: in its variety, majesty and, also, in its violence and tragedy. It has been said that nothing exists that cannot be found within the pages of this awesome legend. The epic describes a ...

Who is who in the Mahabharata
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 344

Who is who in the Mahabharata

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1988
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  • Publisher: Unknown

None

The Mahabharata, Volume 3
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 582

The Mahabharata, Volume 3

The Mahabharata, an ancient and vast Sanskrit poem, is a remarkable collection of epics, legends, romances, theology, and ethical and metaphysical doctrine. The core of this great work is the epic struggle between five heroic brothers, the Pandavas, and their one hundred contentious cousins for rule of the land. This is the third volume of van Buitenen's acclaimed translation of the definitive Poona edition of the text. Book 4, The Book of Virata, begins as a burlesque, but the mood soon darkens amid molestation, raids, and Arjuna's battle with the principal heroes of the enemy. Book 5, The Book of the Effort, relates the attempts of the Pandavas to negotiate the return of their patrimony. They are refused so much as a "pinprick of land," and both parties finally march to battle.

The Mahabharata
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 472

The Mahabharata

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1996
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  • Publisher: Ratna Sagar

She succeeds in presenting all the hues and colours, feelings and emotions, doubts and dilemmas contained in the monumental narrative almost effortlessly. The narrative sustains one s interest despite familiarity with the text.

The Mahabharata
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 168

The Mahabharata

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1979
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  • Publisher: Unknown

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The Mahabharata
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 833

The Mahabharata

The Mahabharata is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India. It is of immense importance to the culture of the Indian subcontinent, and is a major text of Hinduism. Its discussion of human goals (artha or 'purpose', kama or 'pleasure', dharma or 'duty', and moksha or 'liberation') takes place in a long-standing tradition, attempting to explain the relationship of the individual to society and the world (the nature of the 'Self') and the workings of karma.

Mahabharata
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 332

Mahabharata

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The Sauptikaparvan of the Mahabharata
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 140

The Sauptikaparvan of the Mahabharata

In this, the tenth book of the great Indian epic, the Mahabharata, the war has finally ended in victory for the Pandavas. While the victors rejoice, one of the vanquished, Asvatthaman massacres his enemies as they sleep. Pursued afterwards by the five surviving Pandava brothers, Asvatthamanunleashes a weapon of total destruction. But now the great god, Krsna, makes an extraordinary intervention, and a new hope for the social and cosmic order emerges in the form of an unborn child.Saturated in the imagery of the end of the world and the sacrifice of battle, the Sauptikaparvan is a conflux of the narrative and mythic streams of the entire Mahabharata. Through the first complete English translation for over a century of one of its key books, and the first ever in English verse,the present edition is designed to provide an accessible introduction and entry point to one of the greatest works of Indian and world literature.

Lessons from the Mahabharata
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 151

Lessons from the Mahabharata

The Story Of The Mahabharata Is Not Only Of The Great War Between The Kouravas And Pandavas For A Period Of Eighteen Days In The Battlefield Of Kurukshetra Near Delhi. As A Matter Of Fact The Supreme Lesson Held Out By The Great Epic Is The One With Which Vyasa Deva, The Author, Starts-Viz. When Men Live Together As One Family They Not Only Thrive, But They Exist As A Great Community Or Race. As Long As The Pandavas And Kauravas Lived Together They Not Only Thrived As Two Great Wings Of A Race But As One And The Same Race Of The Kurus. As We Proceed With The Story Of The Mahabharata We Notice How This Was Stabilised As Long As They Lived Together With Each Other. And We Have Noticed How The Great War Reduced The Powerful Kurus And Decimated Them To A Struggling Few To Call Themselves As Remnants Of The Great Kuru Race. This Holds Good Not Only In The Case Of Few Families Living Together In Small Units But Number Of Races Living In The World Culminating In The Truth Noticed In The Maxim “One World One Family” Which Is The Title Of The Next Work By The Same Author.