Seems you have not registered as a member of go-pdf.online!

You may have to register before you can download all our books and magazines, click the sign up button below to create a free account.

Sign up

Hallucination
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 432

Hallucination

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2013-08-30
  • -
  • Publisher: MIT Press

Scientific and philosophical perspectives on hallucination: essays that draw on empirical evidence from psychology, neuroscience, and cutting-edge philosophical theory. Reflection on the nature of hallucination has relevance for many traditional philosophical debates concerning the nature of the mind, perception, and our knowledge of the world. In recent years, neuroimaging techniques and scientific findings on the nature of hallucination, combined with interest in new philosophical theories of perception such as disjunctivism, have brought the topic of hallucination once more to the forefront of philosophical thinking. Scientific evidence from psychology, neuroscience, and psychiatry sheds ...

Phenomenal Consciousness
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 236

Phenomenal Consciousness

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2014-12-05
  • -
  • Publisher: Routledge

How can the fine-grained phenomenology of conscious experience arise from neural processes in the brain? How does a set of action potentials (nerve impulses) become like the feeling of pain in one's experience? Contemporary neuroscience is teaching us that our mental states correlate with neural processes in the brain. However, although we know that experience arises from a physical basis, we don't have a good explanation of why and how it so arises. The problem of how physical processes give rise to experience is called the 'hard problem' of consciousness and it is the contemporary manifestation of the mind-body problem. This book explains the key concepts that surround the issue as well as the nature of the hard problem and the several approaches to it. It gives a comprehensive treatment of the phenomenon incorporating its main metaphysical and epistemic aspects, as well as recent empirical findings, such as the phenomenon of blindsight, change blindness, visual-form agnosia and optic ataraxia, mirror recognition in other primates, split-brain cases and synaesthesia.

Epistemology After Sextus Empiricus
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 349

Epistemology After Sextus Empiricus

"Pyrrhonian skepticism is defined by its commitment to inquiry. The Greek work skepsis means inquiry -- not doubt, or whatever else later forms of skepticism took to be at the core of skeptical philosophy. Sextus Empiricus's writings offer the most sophisticated and detailed version of ancient skepticism in the Pyrrhonian tradition. According to Sextus, skeptics neither claim to 'know nothing' nor hold knowledge to be unattainable. Instead they continue to investigate (Outlines of Pyrrhonism 1.1-4). Being a skeptic, unlike, say, a Stoic or a Platonist, is not a matter of holding a certain view. It is to engage in ongoing inquiry of a certain sort. This makes Pyrrhonism an enigmatic presence ...

Alien Experience
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 299

Alien Experience

"We sometimes feel disgusted by-even alienated from-our desires. Suppose I feel alienated from my persistent desire to smoke, and disgusted that the thought of dying while my children are still young isn't enough to extinguish that desire. I could talk to my friends about my predicament, confident that they would sympathize at least to some extent. If I were so inclined, I could also consult work from many distinct philosophical traditions, written in many different centuries, to learn what philosophers have thought was the best way to characterize someone in my condition; what they have thought someone in my condition ought to do; and what philosophical problems they thought could be illumi...

Perception and Its Modalities
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 513

Perception and Its Modalities

This volume is about the many ways we perceive. The chapters explore the nature of the individual senses, how and what they tell about the world, and how they interrelate. They consider how the senses extract perceptual content from receptoral information; what kinds of objects individuals perceive and whether multiple senses ever perceive a single event; how many senses people have, what makes one sense distinct from another, and whether and why distinguishing senses may be useful.

A Variety of Causes
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 591

A Variety of Causes

The book provides an analysis of a key notion in our lives, causation: what its nature is; how we should characterise it in language, how it relates to laws of nature, how causes differ from their effects and why they tend to occur earlier than their effects.

Phenomenal Presence
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 304

Phenomenal Presence

Many different features of the world figure consciously in our perceptual experiences, in the sense that they make a subjective difference to those experiences. These features are thought to range from colours and shapes, to volumes and backsides, from natural or artefactual kinds, to reasons for perceptual belief, and from the existence and externality of objects, to the relationality and wakeful-ness of our perceptual awareness of them. Phenomenal Presence explores the different ways in which features like these may be phenomenally present in perceptual experience. In particular, it focuses on features that are rarely discussed, and the perceptual presence of which is more controversial or...

Regarding the Mind, Naturally
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 290

Regarding the Mind, Naturally

Naturalism is currently the most vibrantly developing approach to philosophy, with naturalised methodologies being applied across all the philosophical disciplines. One of the areas naturalism has been focussing upon is the mind, traditionally viewed as a topic hard to reconcile with the naturalistic worldview. A number of questions have been pursued in this context. What is the place of the mind in the world? How should we study the mind as a natural phenomenon? What is the significance of cognitive science research for philosophical debates? In this book, philosophical questions about the mind are asked in the context of recent developments in cognitive science, evolutionary theory, psycho...

A Mark of the Mental
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 344

A Mark of the Mental

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2017-06-16
  • -
  • Publisher: MIT Press

Drawing on insights from causal theories of reference, teleosemantics, and state space semantics, a theory of naturalized mental representation. In A Mark of the Mental, Karen Neander considers the representational power of mental states—described by the cognitive scientist Zenon Pylyshyn as the “second hardest puzzle” of philosophy of mind (the first being consciousness). The puzzle at the heart of the book is sometimes called “the problem of mental content,” “Brentano's problem,” or “the problem of intentionality.” Its motivating mystery is how neurobiological states can have semantic properties such as meaning or reference. Neander proposes a naturalistic account for sen...

Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 273

Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind

Through much of the twentieth century, philosophical thinking about works of art, design, and other aesthetic products has emphasized intuitive and reflective methods, often tied to the idea that philosophy's business is primarily to analyze concepts. This philosophy from the armchair approach contrasts with methods used by psychologists, sociologists, evolutionary thinkers, and others who study the making and reception of the arts empirically. How far should philosophers be sensitive to the results of these studies? Is their own largely a priori method basically flawed? Are their views on aesthetic value, interpretation, imagination, and the emotions of art to be rethought in the light of b...